Stay on the Ground first, then Dig Down

To the question: How would undergrounding cables in Vietnam improve the local people’s quality of life? The project stemmed from the desperate need for a solution to the large tangles of overhead cables in Vietnam. I always wondered if there was a better solution for the people, hence my research on underground cables via online sources from multiple countries, most specifically the U.S, Australia and Europe, on why they’ve chosen underground cables, their concerns, and final decision. I also did research on Vietnam statistics, but that was more difficult since the data are not available and/or were limited in metaanalysis, so I couldn’t produce very large, assumptions about nation-wide situations. Using datas from other countries do help hypothetically for Vietnam, so in the end I’ve made the conclusion that underground cables would improve local’s quality of life in several ways: it improved their living space’s visual quality, which fosters positive community relationship and life satisfaction; it is less exposed to damage, thereby less likely to lead to outages that cost so much from the people; and thirdly it would reduce electrocution dangers for the Vietnamese people. Finally though, I decided that although underground cables are very beneficial, they won’t be as beneficial to the people as much as if the people are given proper education on electricity safe use. That’s the large finding.     The main challenge I’ve overcome was trying to apply foreign statistics on a country that lacks those needed data, making hypothetical assumptions and imagining a future that those statistics would apply, such as when I have to apply Australian’s data on Vietnam, because I couldn’t find specifics about Vietnamese vehicle accidents due to overhead electric poles. It helps me successfully deliver my justification and conclusion.   Many times I was too absorbed in writing about the many reasons cable improve life, that sometimes I lost track of what I was trying to answer, which always was how those cables improve quality of life. I’ve found good pictures to use and am glad that the visuals turned out neat, but I think the writing could be more concise and coherent. But here I present you with the product: Product Link...

Apparently electrocution problems aren’t too serious

This blog’s a follow-up to the intro of the engineering question: How would undergrounding overhead cables in Vietnam improve the local people’s quality of life? To ground or not to ground is a prevalent and debatable topic in many developed countries, but the question becomes nonsensical to be considered with at the current status of Vietnamese when we have yet to establish concrete electricity lines or ensure safe usage of electricity, which in fact is the main reason for electrocutions, not because of overhead cables, as I had too readily assumed. The statistics for tragic deaths by electric cables are too small to make an impression, even on a national scale (as you can see now I’ve expanded my range from HCMC to Vietnam), and most of them don’t pinpoint exactly to overhead cables. Though despite not being the necessary issue to solve right now, I still do think undergrounding is a better option in the long-term scale for Vietnamese people, but in some places, for example, the Central areas with annual flooding, the underground cables could benefit from an extra layer of rubber sheath. I’m not entirely sure how this might turn out as a product, as the research question is becoming less and less significant as I dig deeper, but anyhow, this problem would be fixed if I will simply be very honest and straightforward with my findings, and perhaps hypothesize instead when Vietnam really do need it, as later developed countries would. I’m behind the schedule so I’ve made some fixes to catch up my pace. What I need to do By this date  Begin progressing Rough Draft of Product 14th May Final Blog Post 15th May Edit 16th May Final Refinements and Edits 17th May Presentation Day 18th...

Overhead Mess in HCMC

Thick, massive, messy chunks of electrical wires hung over our heads everyday as we walk around dear HCMC. Not only are they not aesthetically pleasing to look at, but they also pose great dangers to birds, people, and the environment. So what do you do when you have a problem? You bury them, or in wiring terms, underground them cables. It’s a huge problem in Saigon, Vietnam, and in a city where there’s so many other problem already, it will make me and many people so much happier that there are no more unfortunate news of electrified people and electricity disruptions. Driving Question: How would undergrounding overhead cables in HCMC would improve the local people’s quality of life? I understand that the word “quality of life” is very broad, so I will need to clarify and address some specifics aspect of life qualities when I do my project. Here are some key questions that could help: What are the current threats overhead cables pose in HCMC? What are the pros of undergrounding? The cons? How would the advantages of undergrounding solve the disadvantages of overhead cables? What are some real examples of effective undergrounding? Why do some countries have underground cables and why do some not? It’s possible that I will change my media once I’ve fully gathered my informations, but for now, I have decided on making a website that would have loads of pictures with concise arguments and is easily understood and presented. Here is the my planned timeline: What I need to do By this date 1st Blog 2nd May All arguments  gathered on doc 10th May Find medias and start to organize into product   10th May 2nd Blog Post 11th May  Begin progressing Rough Draft of Product 12th May Final Refinements and Edits 14th May Final Blog Post 15th May Presentation Day 16th May...

Plain Plane is plainly the best

We’ve come back, Chang Hyun, Divina, Jaden and Camellia with another paper plane experiment. And our conclusion: the original travels the furthest And the procedure in which we find out this, is by experimenting on the effect of folded wing width. There is one original straight wing without folds. The other two with folded wings with different width, 3 and 5 cm. Wings Folded like this Scientific Procedure and Data Hypothesis: The more the wings are folded, the further the plane will travel Independent Variable: Width of Folded Wing Dependent Variable: Distance Travelled Control Variable: length, mass, size, The Results can be recorded into this truth-revealing graph: Conclusion is, our hypothesis has failed. We reason that maybe having the wings folded would increase the air resistance, and slow the plane down and resist movement. The graph shows a negative correlation, convincing us that having no folded wings would let the plane travel the furthest. In the end, we decide that our simple, pristine, smooth and childhood plane is the best boy their is for a distance competition....

Paper Plane Fun

By experimenters Divina, Jaden, Chang Hyun and Camellia We decided to test out the best airplane by how far it goes, seeing if a heavy airplane or a lighter one would travel further. Here’s our experiment procedure: Hypothesis: As the mass of the plane increases, then the shorter the distance that the plane will travel Independent Variable: Mass in g with 6 levels of 1.8g increase each (0; 1.8; 3.6; 5.4; 6.2; 8.0) Dependent Variable: Distance (in cm) Control Variable: materials, length, size, wing width Procedure: Using paper clips weighing 0.3 g each to add more weight to the planes, so for each higher level, add 6 paper clips Standing in the hallway, have Jaden launch the plane with consistent amount of force everytime Let it fly and mark the spot where it lands Count the tiles to the spot and times the number of tiles by 40 cm (because each tile measures 40 cm in length) Table 1: Effect of Mass on Plane travel Distance Figure 1: Effect of plane mass on average flight distance Conclusion: Seeing that the average of travelled distance (in cm) decreases with added 1.8 g weight, we can conclude that the heavier the plane is, the shorter the distance that it will travel, a negative correlational  relationship. In conclusion, if we want to have more fun with planes, we should try out lighter ones.  ...

Final Words to the state of tourism in Vietnam at the mercy of global warming

The infographic for the exploration of how global warming would impact the sea tourism in Vietnam is at last finalised. This project was important as it compelled me to recognize the grave consequences of Vietnam’s seaside ecosystem in the near future and, hence, also the economy and social welfare of the Vietnamese. Many of the impacts data confirmed common observations I’ve made from the news and myself. With rising temperature, storms are intensifying and more damaging, marine life is suffering and fading away, and coastal regions are in perpetual threat of being submerged in salty water. All of these inherent problems pose an unbeatable situation to the tourism industry, that will be in the frontier against global warming. Many datas are also astonishing and shocking, such as that the nearly 57% of coral reefs in Phu Quoc is dead and Ho Chi Minh City will be flooded by 20% by late 21st century. The last challenging part to making this product is the process of looking for pictures. At first, authentic naturally pictures are sought for in several sites: Britannica ImageQuest, Unsplash, Pixabay and Flickr. However, even after searching through all, perfect images are so demanded for and yet could not be supplied, that I have to resort to using icons to drive my point. With downloaded icons from Noun Project, the work is more easily done. Still, presentation remained as one of my weakness in doing projects, as I spent too much too playing with the visuals and the layout isn’t too well-planned out. But all the hard work is done, and today, you can access it through this...

Devastating Tourism in Vietnam?

A continuation on the important sustainability research with the driving question: How does global warming impact vacations in Vietnam? I’ve found some alarming statistics about the enduring impact of accentuating storms, salt-water intrusion and rising sea level on the coastal regions and even inner lands of Vietnam, one of the top countries most affected by global warming. Not only would these occurrences ward people off tourist spots in beaches and mesmerizing islands, but they will also affect the fishing industries and transportation tracks and create crazy weathers. The tourism industry might have to recuperate so much in the next decades for the damaging resorts that they wouldn’t profit. Finding these informations are difficult as they are not recorded in popular English news sources, therefore, I had to dig into Vietnamese reports and newspapers for enough details. To better organize, I’ve also made a table of context with the answered key question, links and important to-be-added data. I’m a little behind on the initial schedule, actually 2 days behind, so I’ve revised it to better suit my time. Find pictures and plan out organization of infographic 8th Dec Rough draft of infographic done 9th Dec Finish infographic 10th Dec Final Blog Post (8pm)  11th Dec Final Edit and Refinements 12th...

No more annual holidays by the seaside

Every time my family and I go on vacation, we always tour around large cities with large museums, crowded tourist attractions and perpetual energy-wasting lights. The relaxation of lying under the blazing sun and hear the mellifluous duet of the wind and waves is something we’ve never actually spent our time for, and I’m starting to think that 10 years from now, I’ll be regretting my urban vacation choices. Whatever environmental problems are doing to the Earth, with all the intense storms, floating junks and fish on the ocean surface and , it is discouraging people to come to coastal regions and guiding them inward to mountainous and urban locations. This trend is quite widespread in Vietnam, where beach-lovers are retreating to more touristy cities or adventurous new caves and hiking trails. If I’d want to know where I’m taking my future nieces and nephews on vacations, I’d better start doing this research: Driving Question: How does environmental problems impact the tourism trend? These following key questions should also be considered to make this project an educational and helpful to audiences who will not be willing to meet me in real life: How important annual seaside vacations are to normal people? How will global warming impacts the tourism industry? How will global warming impacts people’s holiday relaxation? What are the tourism trends in the world? I have decided on making an infographic that would be easy to access and understand. Here is the my planned timeline: What I need to do By this date 1st Blog 01.12 Arguments and ideas fully gathered on doc 4.12 Find medias and start to organize into product 6th Dec 2nd Blog Post 6th Dec Product must be ¾ way done 8th Dec Product with all resources included and ideas organized 10th Dec Final Blog Post 8 pm 11th Dec Final Edit and Refinements 12th...