1 Month From When We Started

Unfortunately, this eco-dome was a failure, and I even concluded that it was 2 days before I opened the lid. I think the reason why the cricket died was that he couldn't get to the raisins and nuts. Although crickets could live without nuts or raisins and would prefer rotting plant matter anyway, the cricket must've died because of the air inside of the eco-dome, filled with the rot of the raisins. Besides the raisins, everything else was expected and was the same from last time. The walls were wet, the plants were slowly dying, and the food rotting. But I think in this case, the cricket couldn't even reach to the raisins in the first place, even with the same setup as last time. The food must've rot because of the moist air.

For the next build, and to fix all of this, I figured to not put any food at all, just leaves since crickets like that anyways, according to the website "whatdocricketseat.info". Furthermore, I intend to spray less water (10mil less) in the eco-dome, remove the sticks (crickets can climb on stems anyways), and put more soil in there to sustain the plants.

Old Model

New Model

 

Component Amount incl Units Reasoning Daily Observations
Plant 6X Plants, 5 leaves on each plant A lot of leaves for the cricket to eat The plants are moist from the water constantly evaporating and condensing.
Dirt 3cm 3 cm of dirt, enough for the plants, but not so much that it takes to much space in the ecodome The dirt is less wet, since the water evaporated and is condensed on the walls.
Mulch 0.5cm For variety in the dirt The mulch is less wet, since the water evaporated and is condensed on the walls.
Grass 0.2cm Soft bedding, so that when the water reaches the ground, it doesn’t create mud The cricket moved the plants in such a way that hid most of the grass, which is also wet.
Rocks 6 half-of-a-baseball sized rocks Structure for the cricket to climb and hide Rocks are all still there, unchanged.
Water 10 sprays, and 20ml Moist, so that the cricket and plants could drink. The water has evaporated, and is being cycled through the plants and on in the air.

Observations

Component Amount incl Units Reasoning Daily Observations
Plant 15X Plants, 6 leaf on each plant A lot of leaves for the cricket to eat
Sticks 4X 25cm sticks Structures for the cricket to climb around in the ecodome
Raisins 3 grams So the cricket has variety in food
Dirt 3cm 3 cm of dirt, enough for the plants, but not so much that it takes to much space in the ecodome
Mulch 0.5cm For variety in the dirt
Grass 0.2cm Soft bedding, so that when the water reaches the ground, it doesn’t create mud
Snail Shell 1 snail shell A place where the cricket can hide in
Rocks 25 marble sized rocks Structure for the cricket to climb and hide
Ladybug 1 Will the cricket eat the ladybug?
Transparent cup 1 Structure, so the cricket can climb around
Water 10 sprays, and 25ml Moist, so that the cricket and plants could drink.
Nuts 5 grams For the cricket to have some variety in his diet

Old Model

 

Results: The combinations of all of these things turned out to be a big success. The carrots fed the cricket for a few days, but the cricket never went back to it once it got moldy. The sticks, plants, rocks, and snail shell were all great toys for the cricket to hide in or climb around. There was always fog in the eco-dome, and water was always on the side. The cricket lived for about a week and is still living the last time I checked it three days ago.

Successes: Placement of plants, sticks, and snail shell. The amount of grass, dirt, and mulch was a perfect balance between soil for the plant and space for the cricket.

Failures: The carrots were so moldy by the end of the week. Most of the plants also eventually died as well. There was also so much water on the sides that it got frustrating to just find the cricket.

What to include in the next eco-dome: Since the carrots were moldy, I plan to out in food that is more prone to moisture and mold for the cricket. For example, nuts and seeds. I'll also add smaller amounts of carrots this time. Other than that, all I have to do is put less water in the eco-dome, so it would be easier for me to look inside and find the cricket.

Fixed Model

In science, we were asked to make an eco-dome for a cricket, to put to the test what we have learned about how Earth works. From the nutrient cycle, photosynthesis/respiration, different spheres of Earth, and so forth, we had to replicate all of these things from provided by nature and fit it all in a box. For me, the main goal is to build an eco-dome that would sustain the cricket for the longest amount of time possible.

Observations

 

Component Amount incl Units Reasoning Daily Observations
Plant 20X Plants, 6 leaves on each plant A lot of leaves for the cricket to eat The plants are moist from the water constantly evaporating and condensing.

The also started to slowly die.

Sticks 4X 25cm sticks Structures for the cricket to climb around in the ecodome The sticks are moist for the same reason as the plant.
Carrot 8 grams So the cricket has variety in food The carrots either has water on it, or it has turned to mush.

Carrots have a lot of mold on them.

Dirt 3cm 3 cm of dirt, enough for the plants, but not so much that it takes to much space in the ecodome The dirt is less wet since the water evaporated and is condensed on the walls.
Mulch 0.5cm For variety in the dirt The mulch is less wet since the water evaporated and is condensed on the walls.
Grass 0.2cm Soft bedding, so that when the water reaches the ground, it doesn’t create mud The cricket moved the plants in such a way that hid most of the grass, which is also wet.
Snail Shell 1 snail shell A place where the cricket can hide in Snail shell is barely visible with all the water that is condensed on the wall.
Rocks 25 marble sized rocks Structure for the cricket to climb and hide Rocks are all still there, unchanged.
Ladybug 1 Will the cricket eat the ladybug? Nowhere to be found
Transparent cup 1 Structure, so the cricket can climb around Unchanged
Water 15 sprays, and 25ml Moist, so that the cricket and plants could drink. The water has evaporated, and is being cycled through the plants and on in the air.

Original Ecodome

 

In Language Arts class, we had to make a newspaper, together with our given group. In the entirety of the project, the biggest challenge for me was to get started on the writing of my article. The reason for it was because I didn't know how to approach it. Do I write about this or that? Should I leave that part out? Is this part necessary? What should my main focus be? In the end, I made an outline, including what I should write in that paragraph (in the outline). The outline gave me a boost and made it overall easier for me to write about my topic.

The greatest achievement in this project was the final minutes. In the last moments, my team still had to work on the design of the newspaper. Unfortunately, the paper still had mistakes, so we had to fix all of it in the span of two minutes, and print. Although we rushed, the newspaper still turned out well and gave all of my team good grades.

The only thing that I would change in the second quarter, is to make an outline, first priority. By doing this, I waste less time on thinking, and more on working on the project.

Last week, Mr.Schoonard showed us the don't panic video. The video itself consists of a Swedish gentlemen who people call Hans Rosling, talking about the issues of poverty. Throughout the video, he shows the data through graphs and reports. When the video finished, the biggest takeaway I learned was the percentage of poverty, versus the total population of the world and how many people are in poverty compared to the past. The video would also help me later in life by understanding that poverty isn't that huge of a problem compared to war, drugs, and alcohol abuse. Less than two decades is all we need to end poverty.

 

In science class, we had to make a water filter, to take out all the contaminants within the dirty river water to make it drinkable. For the water to be consumable, it had to be at 6-8 ph level, little to no amount of salt, copper, and dirt. The filter also has to be made out of recyclable or natural material so when broken, anybody can fix it back with easily accessed materials. The water filter couldn't be too big. In the beginning, we brainstormed a few ideas so if one failed the requirements, we had something else to to build. From a bottle that use small spaces to filter out the contaminants, to evaporating the water, we had a wide range of variety during the brainstorming process.

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First prototype

When we made our first prototype (evaporation), we already knew the procedure since we built a similar contraption from the previous class. When we tested it out, we expected the process to go a lot faster, but at the end of the class, we barely had ten milliliter of water. In science, there are bound to be failures, so we tried different ways to improve the model by letting out more steam from the beaker, adding baking soda to the dirty water (to raise the ph), adding charcoal, and to taping the smaller beaker to secure it in the bigger beaker.

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We tried the filter that uses cotton

In the end, we decided to ditch the evaporation filter because it was slow going, and made a water filter out of cotton instead. The final results met the requirement. The turbidity was low, the ph was right on 7, and the amount of copper in the water was little to none. The only thing that made it undrinkable was because the water was blue and it had way too much salt in it. Overall, I didn't hate nor did I liked this project. It was a change to work on a water filter and the results were satisfying because we were able to overcome some obstacles, but I didn't enjoy the project, it just seemed like a change of work for me (instead of sitting with the laptop out, we got to build).

Before we went straight into the sketch, we researched and brainstormed ideas on what it was that we were asked to remove and how we would do it. In the beginning, we didn't have a lot of ideas on how we would make the filter, so we looked up online on how other people do it and took notes on what they used and how it affects the water. With the notes in mind, we moved on to the next step and decided to build a filter that uses evaporation to separate the contaminants from the river water. When that filter failed to generate enough water to test, we changed our filter into the cotton one, that gave us enough water to test and decide what we should do next time. Our team worked well together. There weren't any fights or a lot of disagreements since we had the same ideas and knew our role and what we had to do. Nobody argued on the job that one of our teammates would assign for them and I felt fine working around my teammates.