Now that we've broken sentences down, let's build them up! Then we'll sound really smart, and be more able to express our complicated ideas...

Remember, most of the time we can move ideas around, decide which idea goes first, which will be the main clause idea, where it will go in the sentence...

Important idea #1:

Clauses have a subject and a verb (Santa Claus doesn't do nothing, he delivers presents!) Remember: clauses are Hummers.

Phrases either have a subject and some info, or a verb and some info, but not both!

Remember: phrases are Ferraris.

Here are some ways:

1. Take two full sentences and make a compound sentence using coordinating conjunctions (in other words, you have two main clauses stuck together with a coordinating conjunction: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so , ;  (semi-colon):

Hummer and a Hummer

How would you put these two sentences together to make a compound sentence?

  • Plastics are a convenience for humans as they are cheap and versatile.
  • They are causing the pollution of our earth and oceans.

2. Use a prepositional phrase (preposition + object)  to combine sentences:

This has a phrase and a clause.

Ferrari and a Hummer

How would you put these two sentences together using a prepositional phrase?

  • Humans create and dump over 300 million tons of plastic each year. 
  • They are causing the pollution of our earth and oceans.

3. Use a subordinating conjunction to combine sentences:

This makes two clauses but one is the main and the other supports it. 

Hummer and a Hummer

How would you put these two sentences together using a subordinating conjunction?

  • Plastics are a convenience for humans as they are cheap and versatile.
  • They are causing the pollution of our earth and oceans.

4. Use a dependent clause beginning with a relative pronoun (which, that, whom, whose, or who). 

Hummer and a Hummer

Also known as the gummy worm with the chocolate stick spliced in....

How would you put these two sentences together using a dependent clause?

  • Plastics are a convenience for humans as they are cheap and versatile.
  • They are causing the pollution of our earth and oceans. 

5. List items in a series to combine sentences.

Hummer and however many Ferraris or 

Hummer and however many Hummers

The main clause is followed by two or more phrases or clauses. The last one in the series begins with the coordinating conjunction 'and'. 

Plastics cause pollution to the earth through creating trash.

Plastics cause pollution to the earth through causing overflowing landfills. 

Plastics cause pollution to the ocean through making floating bits that are toxic to aquatic animals.

In Grade One we've been learning about habitats. Animals belong in those places that meet their needs. These first graders are making ecosystem books to teach us about where animals belong.

We also know that in English we need to make sure we use the right verb form to follow the noun. These subject/verb agreement fans help us to get it right!

As you can see, the rules are tricky...

Not only do we need the proper verb form, but we also need precise adjectives to help us make a picture in our mind!

Subject/Verb agreement is important to know when we are talking in the present tense in English.

First, we must know the basic rules:

S:V agreement rules

However we must understand it gets more complicated because some nouns are not easy to categorize as singular or plural:

Noncount noun pdf

Putting these two concepts together, we can come to understand how to correctly speak and write about the present.