CAS Reflection 2016

1) What is the project or experience that you are reflecting on? I volunteered at a school for deaf children during winter break and part of spring break. 2) Describe what happened or what you experienced. I stayed at the school from morning to afternoon to help the teachers with whatever they needed. I also got to interact a lot with the students at the school. 3) What was the most rewarding thing about the experience? I got to understand how difficult it was to be a deaf person, and how it was even more difficult to teach them. I got to learn some sign language, and it was interesting to experience what they felt every day. 4) What skills did you further develop? I was able to develop my communication skills. The students learn how to lip read, but when I spoke to them, I had to speak slowly so they could understand me. I also had to find different ways to talk to the students when the teachers weren’t there to use sign language to tell the students what I was saying. 5) How did you collaborate with others during this activity? I went by myself the first time, but the second time I went with a friend. Right now, we’re trying to think of ways to help the students at the school other than just simply donating money. 6) Did you face any challenges?  How did you overcome them? The first few days I wasn’t sure how to to talk to the students because I didn’t know any sign language. They could understand me through lip-reading, but I couldn’t understand their signing. However, after a few days, I found it easier to make out what they were saying and I also started to understand a little more sign language. The more time I spent with the students, the easier I found it to interact with them. 7) What areas / things of interest would you like to develop more? I would like to learn some more sign language to make communication easier. 8) If you were to do this again, would you do anything differently – why? I don’t think there’s anything that I would like to do differently. I learned something new each day I spent at the school, and I would like to continue to visit the school in the future. 9) Did you learn something new or reach any goals ? Explain. I learned how difficult it was to live with a disability, and it taught me to appreciate what I’ve been given in life. Despite having a hearing disability, the students at the school were all very positive, and from them I learned that it is always better to look at things with a positive attitude.   ‘Service’ Focus Questions / things to note: 1) Where did you go to do service? I went to a school for deaf children (Hy Vong 1) in District 1. 2) Describe what you did at your service experience. I interacted with the students at the school and helped the teachers during class hours. 3) What were the different ways you helped out? Explain. I was assigned to a first grade class, so I mostly helped the teacher with checking the students’ homework and answering any questions that the kids had. 4) Tell us more about  your interactions with the people you worked with. Other than helping out with the first graders, I also got to spend some time with students in the older grades. They taught me some sign language, and I had many opportunities...

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Chemistry

The Chemistry unit in Science was very fun, and I learned a lot. I’ve always liked Chemistry because there is a wide variety of topics, and the experiments are very interesting. I had a little trouble understanding ionic bonding, but after a while, I finally understood it. The experiments we did for the different types of chemical reactions was probably, for me, the highlight of the whole unit. Although I found it a little difficult to explain single and double replacement, I soon found out it was just the positively charged ions that switched places with each other. My partner, Kaithe, and I completed out final project on the chemical reactions, and I feel that the chemistry unit has been the most successful unit for me this year. Here are some pictures from our Chemical Reactions...

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Tu-Anh and Kerry: Big History Project

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The Boston Massacre – Tu-Anh and Kerry

Boston Massacre The streets of Boston were lit up with fire Filled with soldiers and colonists  alike       They hurled taunts and insults at each other The people did not  know what was to come    A frozen log flew up in to the air Not before long had one person fallen cries of horror and sadness filled the streets  No later did smoke fill the cold night air The cruel soldiers firing their muskets Fire if you dare cried all the colonists You dare not fire on us we all know that   So try to scare us for we won’t back down When the cold night air was finally clear   Five people lay dead others were in fear Edited by: Seo Yoon Choi and Dao Nguyen...

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Spanish Presentation

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The Fast & Furious Moment: A Once in a Lifetime Race

Designing and building the Mile-nator was a tiring, although enjoyable experience. I’ve always had trouble with relating Newton’s Three Laws of Motion to real life situations, so it was pretty tough for me to explain how the three laws applied to our car. Our group had decided to make a vehicle that used rubber bands as the source of power. We used cardboard, straws, two CD’s, two bottle caps, a skewer, and of course, rubber bands. It didn’t take us long to find the materials needed and to assemble the car, but we did have a little problem with the wheels. Although there was a time when someone accidentally stepped on our car, we managed to fix it and fortunately, it still ran smoothly. As mentioned in the beginning, our car is slightly different from those of the other groups, as our source of power is the rubber band.   Newton’s First Law of Motion, the Law of Inertia, states that an object will remain at rest or continue moving unless an outside force acts upon it. In our car’s case, the car will remain at rest until we release it, but we have to release only when the rubber band is coiled. The car will keep moving unless an outside force acts upon it, which is when the rubber band stops uncoiling, or when it gets tangled. Friction and gravity are two examples of forces that can stop our vehicle from moving.   Newton’s Second Law, the Law of Acceleration, states that it takes more force to move an object with greater mass. Our car is made out of pretty light materials, so there’s nothing that slowed our car down. If we had used a thicker and heavier piece of cardboard, our car would have slowed down a great deal. In fact, it could be possible our car wouldn’t move at all. There was a slight problem with the rubber band on racing day, so there was one time when our car barely made it past the starting line. It seems as though the rubber band wasn’t strong enough, despite how light our car was. It could possibly be the ground as well, since we were down in the sidewalk, and the surface was quite rough.   Newton’s Third Law, the Law of Action and Reaction, states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. For our car, the action would be our releasing the car and letting the wheels roll. The reaction is the floor pushing up against the car so that the car continues to roll. If that wasn’t the case, then the vehicle probably would have sunk down into the ground.   The vehicle that won the gold medal in our class was the “Dirigible XOXO,” and I can’t help but agree that it was the fastest out of all six vehicles, and it was, most of the time, the vehicle that traveled the farthest. Their vehicle did not travel on land, so that was an advantage. Instead, it traveled on a string, and since the source of power was a balloon, and there was nothing to stop their vehicle from moving (for example surface of the sidewalk, which was very rough and increased friction), the vehicle was able to cross the finish line very quickly.   Our car got fourth place, the second to last place, because we had some rubber band problems during the race. We couldn’t coil it properly, and it got tangled once. One of the wheels was about to fall too, so the car was quite wobbly....

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Slavery Journal- Middle Passage- Audio

Dear Isabel, How are you? How are things going at Lockton’s house? How’s Ruth? I’m so sorry that Miss Mary Finch died, and that you and Ruth had to be sold again to the Locktons. I kind of hoped that Jenny would buy you. Thousands of people are also going through the same things as you and your sister are right now. If you’ve ever wondered how you got to the Americas, here’s how it works. Everyday, thousands of slaves from Africa are being shipped to the Americas through the Middle Passage. The Middle Passage is basically the voyage from Africa to the Americas. That’s probably how you got to the Americas too. The Middle Passage was also used to trade goods between the Americas and Europe. I’ve heard that the Middle Passage was really dangerous and that the slaves barely had any space to move around on the ships. The slaves were forced to stay down below deck, and you can imagine how tightly packed they  were on the ship. Sometimes, before getting chained and put on the ship, the slaves were forced to see their families and loved ones killed right before their very own eyes. I could imagine how hard it was. All the slaves were probably really shocked. Everything was new. The people, the place they were heading to. In one of the books that I read, one of the slaves had never even seen the big ocean in her entire life. She was really shocked when the slaves boarded the ship and headed for the Americas. I can’t even put myself in the situation. It’s too hard to imagine how hard life was on that ship. Although most of the slaves made it to the Americas, not every story ended well. Some of the slaves decided to kill themselves. The thought of that really makes me sad. Those ships were taken to what they called the “New World.” The New World is where you are now. It is where the British made their settlements. If I were to choose, I’d probably choose to die, since I knew that nothing good was going to happen any sooner. I hope you and Ruth will take good care of each other, and I’ll write back to you as soon as I can.   Sincerely, Tu- Anh  ...

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