Chinese Revolution: Opinion Essay

The Communist Revolution caused 9 years of closed, communist China, in which everyone was equally poor. The Chinese Communist party (CCP) started long before the war that resulted in Mao Zedong’s rule for 9 years. It started back in 1921, as a defence against the Japanese forces in China during the Second Sino-Japanese war. They joined with the Nationalist party, freeing Shanghai together, before they were forced disband, and only to continue their practices in an underground operation. Chairman Mao’s legendary Long March from 1934-1935 saved him and the communist party from the KMT (Nationalist party, also Kuomintang or Guomindang). At the beginning of the retreat from the KMT, Mao Zedong’s ideas were rejected in favor of another man’s, who also kicked him off the central communist circle. Eventually, after losing much of the Red Army, the power was given back to Mao Zedong in 1935, who changed their tactics, continuing their quest to conquer China. On October 1st of 1949, Mao Zedong declared that the CCP had won, forcing the KMT to flee to Taiwan. After gaining power over all of China, the CCP spent 18 years attempting to quickly strengthen China’s economy. During this time period, Mao Zedong attempted the disastrous “Great Leap Forward” constructing industries in rural countries. Finally, during 1967, Mao Zedong became the ruler, making the country “The People’s Republic of China” (PRC). During his rule, Mao Zedong banned education, forcing all scholars to work instead. The first words out of any person had to be, roughly translated, is “long live Chairman Mao”. In 1966, in another attempt to show his authority and reinvigorate China’s revolutionary spirit, he launched the ‘Cultural Renovation’. His goal was to purge impure elements from the PRC, one point five million people died because of this. As well as destroying most of the country’s cultural heritage. During 1967, seeing that several cities were close to anarchy, the army was sent in to restore order in China. After his death in 1976, there was a power struggle mainly between three parties. Which ended in the rise of Deng Xiaoping in 1980. Without completely denouncing the rule of Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping eased the strict laws on foreign investment. He ran the country with a Capitalist system. The export and consumer sections in the economy rapidly improving, the increase of the middle class, was shown in the quick increase in GDP (Gross Domestic Product), which shows the market value of all officialized final exports and services within the country. Personally I believe that this war was meant to happen, but there were some mistakes along the way that probably could have been avoided. The Long March was a necessary component in the war, because it proved to the CCP that Mao Zedong was probably the best candidate to be the person commanding the Red Army. However, I do not think that it was a very good idea when Mao Zedong banned education from his people. I know that he believes that China should be a communist country, but why does it mean that education must be perished. Why doesn’t he educate all of his citizens in order to improve China’s general welfare. Perhaps he was afraid that educating his people would give them ideas, and that the way he ran the country was wrong, giving them the chance to overthrow him. If there was one thing that the Nationalist party had done right, it was providing their citizens with education, constructing schools, education is the key to a better economy. It seems as though he doesn’t quite care about the general...

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Chinese Revolution: Key figure Mao Zedong

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Chinese Revolution: Events Leading Up To The War

/code> http://prezi.com/qfh9jenxkwgi/chinese-revolution/

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Introduction to: Music

I ask that they listen closely feel the beat flowing and savor every word   or hold it close   I say transport yourself into the land and explore every crevice   or feel the notes changing and clashing to find the meaning trapped inside   I want them to pay attention floating in the space that contains nothing and everything.   All they want is to find a distraction ignore the entertainer and let their efforts go to waste.   They only realize when its gone how they should have paid attention....

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Response to: Inside Out and Back Again

The world of ten year-old Vietnamese girl, Ha, is changed forever when the Vietnam war forces her family to move to the USA. Her father is never present in the book, “Inside Out and Back Again” by Thanhha Lai. He is, however, mentioned several times before being proclaimed dead after her mother performs a ritual about his destiny. Their move to the US is not an uncommon one, therefore there is a refugee camp for those with similar dispositions. The only way for a Vietnamese family to leave the refugees camp was to be sponsored by an American. Ha’s family is sponsored by a man from Alabama, who she refers to as her cowboy. Their neighbor Mrs. Washington, a former teacher, tutors them in English. With her English slowly improving, she is sent to school along with her older brother, Khoi. She constantly teased in school by a person she refers to as “pink boy”. She learns some defensive moves from her older brother, Vu, who insists on being called Vu Lee. Her life becomes much easier as the cousin “pink boy” had convinced to beat her up, developed a crush on Vu Lee. The book ends as she prays for the good fortune of her family in the following year.   I think that the theme of this book is adapting to and accepting change. She was incredibly confused and annoyed at some things at first, but she slowly learned to accept and even appreciate them as the story evolved. At the beginning of the story, she was dead-set on not leaving Vietnam. At first she lists all the reasons she liked Vietnam over America, even going so far as to say “no one would believe me but at times I would choose wartime in Saigon over peacetime in Alabama.” Yet, as the story progressed, she seemed to find more and more things that she realized that she liked in the US, learning to compromise. She had raved about her papaya tree, as mentioned in the poem with the same title, she had left back in Vietnam to Mrs. Washington. Who, in turn, gave her a packet of dried papayas as a christmas present. She hated it, saying, “it was not the same” but after her mother soaked them in water, she added, “but not bad at all”. The tantrum she threw before finally acquiescing to the present is one of the many reasons I found her quite annoying at times. There are some instances in the book in which she acts like a spoiled brat, however, she is only 10 and just had her life ripped away from her, I suppose she is entitled to her attitude. I found her naive attitude incredibly annoying, demanding her sponsor to let her ride his horse the day she signed up for school. Poor Vu Lee had to play the part of interpreter again and explain to her that the man did not, in fact, have a horse. In conclusion, I did not like the main character very much, I did like the other characters...

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AOW Response: Want kids to become scientists? Don’t arrest them for experimenting

A 16 year old teen has been arrested for conducting a science experiment that resulted in an explosion behind the school cafeteria. A good.com article, “Want kids to be scientists? Don’t arrest them for experimenting” by Liz Dwyer explains the unfair treatment of Kiera Wilmot. She conducted a popular youtube experiment consisting of toilet bowl cleaner and aluminum foil. The result was an explosion, which led the school to call the police. The police arrested her for two federal crimes, and they are looking into trying to and send her to jail. The author begins to explain her view of the incident about how the teen should be encouraged to continue with her science experiments in school instead of being expelled and sent to jail.   The author strongly protests the treatment of the teen when she writes, “Instead of encouraging her future in chemistry, the school also expelled her. The tone of the author is definitely incredibly annoyed, as shown when she writes, “How is that we talk so big in America about wanting kids to be scientists so that we can compete in the global economy, only to turn around and arrest them when they actually take the initiative to engage and experiment?” She protests the way America seemingly encourages kids to experiment, only to arrest them to do as encouraged. She also seems to have not reread what she wrote before posting the article as her article ends in, “leading many to suggest that since Wilmot is black there’s another element at play.” which has no connections with anything she had written before. A concluding sentence should not be adding additional information, let alone information almost completely unrelated to any else she had written before. The author is quite biased in her opinion of this event, she seems to only want to see it from the teen’s point of view. I cannot find even one sentence that shows that she had tried to understand it from the schools point of view. I believe that both sides of this incident are justified to do what they had chosen. The school saw that a student was bringing explosives, then using it on school grounds. In my opinion, they are perfectly justified to punish the student, no one should be rewarded for creating a danger hazard in school without the guidance of a teacher. Science experiment or not, that kind of behavior should not be rewarded. I understand that the student was curious, but why would she conduct the experiment behind the school cafeteria? She’s practically begging to be punished. Despite this, I think that its slightly extreme that they called the police. I believe that the author was jumping to conclusions when told that she could possibly be sent to jail. People before the age of 18, where they are considered a full adult, can’t be sent to jail, the worst that could happen would be that she is sent to juvenile hall. Police are not even supposed to mention her name, had the incident been written on the...

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AOW Response: A Baby With HIV is Deemed Cured

It’s a miracle! A baby seems to have been cured of HIV. The baby’s mother had not had any check ups with the doctors throughout her entire pregnancy and arrived in the hospital already in labor, therefore having no chance to check to see if she had HIV. Upon withdrawing 2 vials of blood from the baby and testing for RNA viruses and retroviruses, the doctor started treating the baby aggressively with antiretroviral drugs immediately, even before the test results came back. Based on her past experience, the doctor had known that the one or two drugs she was supposed to provide the child with to help defend or prevent the disease would not be as helpful. The doctors continued the intense treatment for 18 more months before the mother stopped going to the hospital. The baby was brought back again after another 5 months and the tests came back surprisingly negative. There is more about this story in “In Medical First: A baby with HIV is Deemed Cured” written by Andrew Pollack.   I believe that the authors tone in this article seems quite hopeful, as is shown in “If further study shows this works in other babies, it will almost certainly be recommended globally.” The author seems to hope that this cure could become a reality. “this new one could suggest there is something different about babies’ immune systems” is a quote in the article said by Dr. Joseph McCune. “Could suggest” seems as though the doctor is skeptical, but still holding on to some hope. I think that the author seems to completely overlook the fact that the doctors shouldn’t be treating the infants without their parent’s consent. It is not mentioned once in the article that the doctors ever asked this baby’s mother whether or not she was alright with her child being a science experiment. I would also like to know why the doctor, instead of following the normal course of giving the baby one or two drugs to defend the child from HIV, had immediately jumped in and given the baby incredibly strong drugs without even knowing if it would need them. It would be incredible if this cure to be real, so many more children could live better lives due to this...

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AOW Response: Syrian Refugees’ Most Important Things

The syrian war has caused many people be forced to flee from their homes. Their desolate position has taught them to see what was truly important to them. When asked, a common answer was family, however, a man named Ahmed told Brian Sokol, the author of this article, “In pictures: Syrian refugees’ most important things” that his walking stick was most important to him. He insists that he would not have been able to make the journey across the border without it. A Syrian mother, Iman, brought her children along with a religious book that she believes will provide protection. An 8 year old girl named May says that she misses her doll Nancy, and states that her bracelets are now her most prized possession. Most of the other pictures depict how the refugees learnt how much they truly appreciated family.   The author, Brian Sokol, had taken photographs of these refugees with their most prized possessions. Strangely, he did not betray very much emotion through this post, other than the obvious pity and sadness, instead keeping his descriptions short and to the point, often quoting his subjects as well. The author only took black and white photographs, probably in attempt to capture the drab and ashen feel of the place. Most of these people seem to be in tents and sitting on tarps in the picture, courtesy of the refugee camp. I don’t quite understand why some people have such different values that some people can find that family is most important, while others could value a walking stick over their family. While everyone knows how horrible wars are, and how much it would cost those involved, they still fight. Sometimes, there are just no ways to stop...

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AOW Response: FBI Released the Tsarnaevs Photos because of Reddit and the Post

I’m sure that you would have heard about the Boston Bombing by now, be it from the news, friends, or family. The boston bombing has affected many lives and the FBI have recently released photos of who they suspect have caused the whole ordeal. More can be read about this in an article named “FBI Released the Tsarnaevs’ Photos because of Reddit and the Post” written by Conner Simpson. The suspects are two brothers named Dzokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaevs. Tamerlan, the older brother, died in the explosion, while Dzokhar is in a coma.   The article’s main focus should have been the influence social media has upon the FBI instead of naming the FBI’s feelings upon the subject. “The social media site and notorious tabloid emerged as front runners in the race to distribute potentially useful but ultimately useless information in the early days of the investigation.“ from the way the author writes this sentence, I can tell that he respects the popularity of these sites but does not seem to find them very promising. Judging from the way the author wrote “It was just another example of cops being cops, and succeeding when we needed them most” the author most likely has a profound respect for the police, feeling that they will always come through when needed.   I think that it’s very interesting to see the fight of police authority figures against the power of social media, which consists of most of America’s young generation. It seems as though the bombing suspects were probably not expecting to survive the attack because of the fact that one of them is dead while the other is lying on a hospital bed. If Dzokhar Tsarnaevs doesn’t wake from his coma, the whole case against the two brothers would be based on the word of a victim from the attack....

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AOW Response: Spreading Racism Via Facebook

People have started using Facebook as a tool to express their opinions on racial issues. There is an article written about this issue named “Spreading racism via Facebook” which was written by Tom Jacobs. The article tells about how some users have been using Facebook to express how they feel about the racial issues. One particular user named Jack Brown was quoted in the article writing out how he felt that ‘whites’ are the most oppressed group in America. There has also been research done by several physiologists about how the frequency of visits from a user to Facebook affected their behavior toward the racist opinions.   As the first sentence of the article clearly states that “Heavy Facebook users are more likely than those who log on occasionally to react positively to racist remarks.” Yet the author later contradicts himself as he writes “more-frequent Facebook users did not differ from the others in their reaction to the egalitarian message.” which probably indicates that he was unsure about the theory. Yet the author sounds a bit smug as he describes the results of how frequency of visits affected opinions, as though he were right all along. The author seems disturbed by the “superiority message” Jack Brown had written. The authors tone towards the racist comments were obviously disgusted, as he describes them as a “disturbing implication”. This subject is clearly a large issue as being called racist seems to be one of the worst insults you could say of someone. I, personally, think that racism has nothing to do with ignoring the skin tone of other people, but more as knowing another’s skin tone but giving them the same chance you would give to everyone else. I don’t believe that you have to like everyone of a certain race because you would be considered if you didn’t, it’s merely a matter of liking someone based on their...

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